Tuesday, 30 December 2008

Sickness among teachers.

"Teachers are calling in sick at the rate of 15,000 a day.

Almost three million working days were lost last year, up from 2.5million in 1999. Some 311,000 teachers took at least one day off.

Tories called the official figures 'very worrying', linking them with mounting bureaucracy and disruptive classroom behaviour.

The Government's school workforce statistics, which cover full and part-time teachers and classroom assistants, show the average number of sick days has risen from 5.1 a head in 1999 to 5.4 in 2007.

The overall number of days lost was 2.9million. This equates to almost 15,000 teachers off sick on each school day.

The total of 311,770 who took sickness absence is well over half the number working in English schools.

The rising levels of sick leave mean more pupils have to be taught by unfamiliar supply teachers who may not be specialists in the subjects they are teaching.

Tory children's spokesman Michael Gove said the cost of teacher absence could run into hundreds of millions. Schools have to pay £103 to £210 a day for supply teachers.

Teaching unions said stress was 'endemic' to teaching in Britain.

NUT acting general secretary Christine Blower said: 'Given the enormous pressures teachers are under, it is remarkable they have so little sick leave."


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Approach to teaching

Methods there are many, principles but few, methods often change, principles never do